Trinity Exposed

Dedicated to exposing the truth about the Trinity through the admissions of Trinitarian Apologists,Historians, and Scholars themselves. A necessary tool for all those who want to enlighten ordinary trinitarians who are ignorant to these facts.

Tuesday, October 17, 2006

The holy spirit

The New Catholic Encyclopedia:
"The O[ld] T[estament] clearly does not envisage God's spirit as a person . . . God's spirit is simply God's power. If it is sometimes represented as being distinct from God, it is because the breath of Yahweh acts exteriorly. ... The majority of N[ew] T[estament] texts reveal God's spirit as something, not someone; this is especially seen in the parallelism between the spirit and the power of God. ... On the whole, the New Testament, like the Old, speaks of the spirit as a divine energy or power. ... Nowhere in the Old Testament do we find any clear indication of a Third Person."
"For nowhere in the Old Testament do we find any clear
indication of a Third Person. Mention is often made of
the Spirit of the Lord, but there is nothing to show
that the Spirit was viewed as distinct from Yahweh
Himself. The term is always employed to signify God
considered in His working, whether in the universe or in the soul of man."

Catholic theologian Edmund Fortman:
"The Jews never regarded the spirit as a person; nor is there any solid evidence that any Old Testament writer held this view. . . . The Holy Spirit is usually presented in the Synoptics [Gospels] and in Acts as a divine force or power. ... Although this spirit is often described in personal terms, it seems quite clear that the sacred writers [of the Hebrew Scriptures] never conceived or presented this spirit as a distinct person." (The Triune God)
Although this spirit is often described in personal terms, it seems quite clear that the sacred writers [of the Hebrew Scriptures] never conceived or presented this spirit as a distinct person" (The Triune God, p. 9).

The New Catholic Encyclopedia:
"The majority of N[ew] T[estament] texts reveal God's spirit as something, not someone; this is especially seen in the parallelism between the spirit and the power of God." (1967, Vol. XIII, p. 575) It also reports: "The Apologists [Greek Christian writers of the second century] spoke too haltingly of the Spirit; with a measure of anticipation, one might say too impersonally."-Vol. XIV, p. 296.

"The Old Testament clearly does not envisage God’s spirit as a person…God’s spirit is simply God’s power. If it is sometimes represented as being distinct from God, it is because the breath of Yahweh acts exteriorly…The majority of New Testament texts reveal God’s spirit as something, not someone; this is especially seen in the parallelism between the spirit and the power of God" (1967, Vol. 14, pp. 574, 575).


A Catholic Dictionary:
"On the whole the New Testament, like the Old, speaks of the spirit as a divine energy or power" (W.E. Addis and Thomas Arnold, 1960, p. 810).

"The third Person was asserted at a Council of Alexandria in 362...and finally by the Council of Constantinople of 381" (p. 812).

Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature:
"[Matt. 28:19] proves only that there are the three subjects named,...but it does not prove, by itself, that all the three belong necessarily to the divine nature, and possess equal divine honor…This text, taken by itself, would not prove decisively either the personality of the three subjects mentioned, or their equality or divinity" (McClintock and Strong, Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature, 1987, Vol. X, p. 552).

New Testament Theology:
"The notion of the Holy Spirit as a third divine
personality is one of the most disastrous importations into the Holy Scriptures" (W. Beyschlag, New Testament Theology, Vol. 2, p. 279).

Gregory of Nazianzus, Bishop of Constantinople, wrote in 380 AD:
"Of our thoughtful men, some regard the Holy Spirit as an operation, some as a creature and some as God; while others are at a loss to decide, seeing that the Scripture determines nothing on the subject" (Oratio 38: De Spiritu Sancto).

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